Electron Microscope Image

Program

Dissertation

Candidates must prepare, submit, present and defend a written dissertation.

The dissertation must be based on original and independent research conducted by the student under the guidance of the graduate supervisory committee. The dissertation must demonstrate the candidate's ability to address a major intellectual problem and to propose meaningful questions and hypothesis through the mastery of research methods, theory, and tools of the discipline.

An oral, public defense of the dissertation is required and is scheduled for a minimum of two hours. A copy of the dissertation is given to the department and copies are placed in the three participating campus libraries.

Graduate Faculty Supervisory Committee

With input from the student, the Materials Science Leadership Council will recommend the committee composition for each student. The committee will have at least five members, including at least one faculty member from a collaborating campus and one member appointed by the graduate dean of the campus where the student is enrolled.

The committee chair (the student's advisor) must be a member of the graduate faculty who is approved to chair dissertation committee in the Materials Science program. A majority of the faculty committee must be Materials Science faculty, however, academic professionals, research scientists, industrial professionals and other non-Materials Science faculty may serve on doctoral supervisory committees with approval of the graduate director and the Graduate College of the home institution.

Students should contact their graduate advisor for instructions for approval and assignment of such individuals to the committee.

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A Montana Tech student loads a sample for examination with a table-top electron microscope

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raman microscope and high temperature furnace at Montana State University

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professor and X-ray diffractometer

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Montana Tech post-fire assessment with drill resistance testing equipment

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Montana State University students and professor

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Using hyperspectral analysis to examine nanoparticle interactions with cells.

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HyRox digital microscope examination of complex metal microstructure at Montana Tech

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high temperature fuel cell assembly at Montana State University

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thermogravimetric analysis at Montana Tech

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thermal gravimetric analysis at Montana State University

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Montana Tech GENL Far-field Probing Station

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Montana Tech field effect scanning electron microscope

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preparing samples for study in the X-ray Diffractometer at Montana State University

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installing heads on a hydrocyclone test stand at Montana Tech

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Fluorescence decay traces from the ultrafast emission lifetime spectrometer at Montana State University

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Adjusting flowrates in a continuous aqueous processing system at Montana Tech

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Optical elements of a time correlated single photon counting instrument at Montana State University

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dilatometer at Montana Tech

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in situ vibrational spectroscopy measurements with Ar+ ion laser and high temperature solid oxide fuel cell at Montana State University

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Montana Tech GENL Electrospinning tool

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adjusting gas flows into high temperature solid oxide fuel cell at Montana State University

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Montana Tech GENL Nanonics Near-field Scanning Optical Microscope